Oh No, I Forgot My Quarters

A Tribute to Wonder Woman in Daily Life

“Oh No, I Forgot My Quarters” captures a feeling that all of us have had at one time or another. When it seems as though nothing more could happen to frustrate you further, another frustration arises. This satirical portrayal of one of the most capable women ever, however fictitious, serves to exemplify that feeling of “enough is enough”. For the housewife it is a validation, you have far too many things to handle, you truly don’t deserve this! For anyone who feels overburdened, you are not alone.

Part Harry G.Peter, part Edward Hopper “Quarters” is not Marston’s Wonder Woman, she is anyone who has ever felt the pressure of the modern world. Even her super powers and magic lasso can’t protect her from the perils of laundry day, or obnoxious fighting children. Aren’t they precious?!

Every element of this painting is a joy to me but I’ll point out a few key features…

As in every one of the super hero paintings, the hero is presented in a more graphic, flat color, outlined style, most like those found in the comic books I grew up with, while the surroundings are quite different. In this case, the foreground, the dryers, the detergent bottle, even the window are rendered in exquisitely realistic detail and the background is a blatant Hopper forgery.

Those kids in the “wagon train”.

Oh No, I Forgot My Quarters

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 27″ x 36″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 27″ x 36″ – $700

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Call Before You Dig

A Tribute to Batgirl and Robin in Daily Life

“Call Before You Dig” is a classic parody. Batgirl and Robin are finally married and living in a house of their own, far from the watchfull eye of Batman. Independent, young, energetic and a bit ignorant, they seek to beautify their property by doing their own landscaping. Robin, seeking to impress the lovely Batgirl, digs a bit too deep, blowing up the yard and catching the house on fire. This is an actual problem for many and great caution should always be employed when digging deep in one’s own yard. A simple call ahead can prevent disaster.

Some of my favorite things about this painting…

This is a popular Grant Wood painting for parody artists, however what sets this one apart is that I was able to find some photographs of the actual house that the painting was modelled after giving me a real perspective on the rest of the “yard” I was going to blow up!

Also, I painted a very large reproduction of another Grant Wood painting for the movie “A Simple Plan”

Call Before You Dig

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

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Helpless

A Tribute to Superman in Daily Life

“Helpless” is one of those paintings where, even as the artist, I am struck by the depth of meaning every time I look at it. It’s meaning changes for me as my understanding of myself and my perception of the world around me changes.

Even while painting it, my intention changed a couple of times. The thought occurred to me to put the man of steel in the role of the husband and father, devoutly fulfilling his domestic responsibilities, only to be challenged with a choice of which duty to uphold as the tragedy of the events of 9/11 unfolded behind him. I didn’t do it. I copped out. I surrendered to a “weakness of purpose”. I thought I might make people not want to buy the giclee because it made them uncomfortable, sad or angry. I painted it without 9/11. But that was the point.

What do I like about this painting?…

I changed my mind and painted the painting I intended to paint.

It continues to make me re-examine my feelings about that day and more. Whose responsibility was it really?

Helpless

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

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Move it Dad, You’re Gonna Make Me Late for Class

A Tribute to the Incredible Hulk in Daily Life

“Move it Dad, You’re gonna make me late for class” deals with a couple of issues which face society within the United States more alarmingly now than ever. The first is obesity. More kids are ending up fat. It is a fact and it isn’t a good one. There are many reasons, influences, bad practices and common shortcomings which have caused this to happen.
One of them is actually the second issue addressed in this painting, namely, parent abuse.

The fact that we’ve done it to ourselves doesn’t help matters any. Many parents today don’t know how to say no to children in any substantive way. They indulge the slightest whim or barter for approval from their own offspring with treats or gifts. And why not? They do the same with themselves, coping with stress by eating or drinking.

I like this painting because it places one of the most powerful characters in comics in the position so many of us share, parenthood.

We must decide what choices we are going to present to our children and can only do so responsibly by understanding them for ourselves.

Move it Dad, You’re Gonna Make Me Late for Class

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

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Get the Door, I’m Enjoying My Cognac

A Tribute to Batman in Daily Life

“Get the Door, I’m Enjoying My Cognac” places the caped crusader in a desperate battle with marriage and housework. While the wife relaxes with an afternoon cognac and a cigar, the once stalwart bachelor dutifully receives the package from the UPS delivery carrier.

The wife represents every negative stereotype of high-maintenance while flipping the role as domestic worker over to the male in this heterosexual couple. It is at once a peek into the psyche of a man who feels he is overworked and under-appreciated while highlighting the way many women must feel in the housewife role.

Things I like most about this one…

The wife is ready to party, looking like she is ready to go out and our hero is still neck-deep in work.

He is so loaded down that he can’t even sign for the package.

Get the Door, I’m Enjoying My Cognac

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

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Hurry Up, the Baby Just Filled His Pants

A Tribute to Aquaman in Daily Life

“Hurry Up, the Baby Just Filled His Pants” is really about choices on so many levels. Every one of us has had to choose between one thing we want, or think we want and another. Often that other is what we have grown accustomed to and the thing we think we want is just different. Many of us make that choice only to regret it later, even if what we have chosen is truly something we want on some level. The man of the sea is facing that feeling right now. He truly loves his wife and child but the sea is calling him into the freedom of the sunset. The water caresses his legs and beckons him away from his earthly burden.

I pulled out the airbrush for this one to create a beautiful Lassen sunset, with a realistic wife and child to counter the comic hero.

My favorite bits…

I am not the hero.

The toy snail in the sand bucket.

Hurry Up, the Baby Just Filled His Pants

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

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Leadership

A Tribute to Captain America in Daily Life

Captain America, the patriotic war fighter who normally attacks the foes of the United States is satirically shown here making a peace offering. The surprise offering from this patriot causes a change of heart in an Iraqi adolescent fighter causing him to put down his gun.

Also note the uncharacteristic posture of Captain America sitting relaxed in a lotus position amongst the rubble of battle using his shield to protect “the enemy.” This more rational and peaceful approach in the Middle East is almost certainly not the tact we can expect from the Trump administration. Hopefully a new, moral imperative of peace may emerge from the people, suggesting a different approach rather than jumping to unsubstantiated conclusions or attempting to justify unjust wars.

Leadership

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 38″ x 25″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 38″ x 25″ – $700

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Camel Beats Flash aka Second-hand Smoke Shop

A Tribute to the Flash in Daily Life

The Flash, the super hero who can move faster than anyone, even violating the laws of physics, is depicted in this spoof with end-stage emphysema. Despite his protest, the evil, “Camel Joe” is able to wheel the breathless, powerless Flash into the second-hand shop with all of its smoking paraphernalia to unmercifully tease and remind him of the fate that befalls smokers.

We all have the right to personal choice, but we must also acknowledge and become accountable for the consequences of our actions. Cigarettes truly are “cancer sticks” and in time they will leave you breathless or dead.

Camel Beats Flash aka Second-hand Smoke Shop

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

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Homeless

A Tribute to Iceman in Daily Life

“Homeless” places Iceman, one of the original X-Men on the streets, homeless due to greenhouse gas escalation brought on by humans. Despite his powers, defined on Wikipedia as: Generates freezing temperatures to create and manipulate ice, can transform his body into ice, Iceman is without a home.

The carelessness with which those who “have” use up resources with little or no regard for the world we inhabit or the people around them is central to the theme of this painting. However, Iceman represents more than the inhabitants of the arctic, he represents those people who find themselves on the streets because they have no opportunity to earn enough to keep their homes due to a drastically lopsided economic landscape.

The woman driving the hummer is deep into her own reflection (she imagines herself as Princess Grace) as she pours her unwanted, over-sized coffee out onto the street, oblivious to the plight of our hero and her role in his unfortunate situation.

My Favorite parts…

“Alaskan Palms, an Undeniably Affluent Gated Community.”

The girl thinks she’s Princess Grace in the mirror.

Homeless

Archival Quality Giclee on Canvas

Framed 36″ x 27″ – $850

Unframed – Studio Wrap 36″ x 27″ – $700

To Order, Please Contact Us